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  • Humphrey Hippo
    20140819 Fiery Fractal

    20140819 Fiery Fractal

  • luluBLEU
    STOCK-V-FIRE-01

    STOCK-V-FIRE-01

  • Humphrey Hippo
    Playing with Fire

    Playing with Fire

  • Jason Wells
    Army Air Corps WAH-64D Apache

    Army Air Corps WAH-64D Apache

  • Jason Wells
    Army Air Corps WAH-64D Apache in front of a wall of fire

    Army Air Corps WAH-64D Apache in front of a wall of fire

  • Jason Wells
    Army Air Corps WAH-64D Apache

    Army Air Corps WAH-64D Apache

  • Jason Wells
    Army Air Corps WAH-64D Apache in front of a wall of fire

    Army Air Corps WAH-64D Apache in front of a wall of fire

  • Marcia and Mike Nelson Pedde
    1941 Chevy Tudor

    1941 Chevy Tudor

  • Chic Photography
    WY001878

    WY001878

  • prismalightstudio
    Where There?s Smoke

    Where There?s Smoke

  • SNRE Communications
    Feet warming by fireplace

    Feet warming by fireplace

  • Bill Coe (billcoephotos)

    Bill Coe (billcoephotos)'s photo

  • Marsha Bala
    Tulips flames

    Tulips flames

  • Joe Covington
    Sky Flames

    Sky Flames

  • Nir
    Light Festival 2017 in Jerusalem, Israel

    Light Festival 2017 in Jerusalem, Israel

  • Manuel Martin
    Sea Of Flames

    Sea Of Flames

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7513

    BPD_7513

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7511

    BPD_7511

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7512

    BPD_7512

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7509

    BPD_7509

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7510

    BPD_7510

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7556

    BPD_7556

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7554

    BPD_7554

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7551

    BPD_7551

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7546

    BPD_7546

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7527

    BPD_7527

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7526

    BPD_7526

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7525

    BPD_7525

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7524

    BPD_7524

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7523

    BPD_7523

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7522

    BPD_7522

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7521

    BPD_7521

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7520

    BPD_7520

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7519

    BPD_7519

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7518

    BPD_7518

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7517

    BPD_7517

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7516

    BPD_7516

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7515

    BPD_7515

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7514

    BPD_7514

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7504

    BPD_7504

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7502

    BPD_7502

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7496

    BPD_7496

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7493

    BPD_7493

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7492

    BPD_7492

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7487

    BPD_7487

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7484

    BPD_7484

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7482

    BPD_7482

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7479

    BPD_7479

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7478

    BPD_7478

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7477

    BPD_7477

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7476

    BPD_7476

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7474

    BPD_7474

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7475

    BPD_7475

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7472

    BPD_7472

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7473

    BPD_7473

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7471

    BPD_7471

  • Brad Peterson
    Air Tractor AT-802F United States Light 807 US gallons (3,050 L) AN-32P Firekiller Ukraine Medium 2,113 US gallons (8,000 L) AT-1002 United States Medium 1,000 US gallons (3,800 L) BAe 146 United Kingdom Medium 3,000 US gallons (11,000 L) Beriev Be-200 Russia Medium 3,173 US gallons (12,010 L) Bombardier CL-415 Canada Medium 1,621 US gallons (6,140 L) Bombardier Dash 8 Q400-MR Canada Medium 2,600 US gallons (9,800 L) Canadair CL-215 Canada Medium 1,300 US gallons (4,900 L) Douglas B-26 United States Medium No longer in service Douglas DC-4 United States Medium No longer in service Douglas DC-6 United States Medium 2,800 US gallons (11,000 L) Douglas DC-7 United States Medium 3,000 US gallons (11,000 L) Evergreen 747 Supertanker United States Super Heavy 20,500 US gallons (78,000 L) Fairchild C-119 Flying Boxcar United States Medium No longer in service Grumman S-2 Tracker United States Medium 1,200 US gallons (4,500 L) Ilyushin Il-76 Russia Heavy 11,419 US gallons (43,230 L) Lockheed C-130 Hercules United States Medium 3,000 US gallons (11,000 L) (National Guard MAFFS units) Lockheed L-188 Electra United States Medium 3,000 US gallons (11,000 L) Martin Mars United States Medium 7,200 US gallons (27,000 L) McDonnell Douglas DC-10 United States Heavy 12,000 US gallons (45,000 L) North American B-25 United States Medium No longer in service P-2V Neptune United States Medium 2,362 US gallons (8,940 L) P-3 Orion United States Medium 3,000 US gallons (11,000 L) - military version of the L-188 Electra PBY Catalina United States Medium 1,000 US gallons (3,800 L) or 1,500 US gallons (5,700 L) for the Super model PZL-Mielec M-18 Dromader Poland Light 570 US gallons (2,200 L) ShinMaywa US-2 Japan Medium 3,595 US gallons (13,610 L) [20]

    Air Tractor AT-802F	United States	Light	807 US gallons (3,050 L)
AN-32P Firekiller	Ukraine	Medium	2,113 US gallons (8,000 L)
AT-1002	United States	Medium	1,000 US gallons (3,800 L)
BAe 146	U ...

  • Brad Peterson
    Lockheed P2V

    Lockheed P2V

  • Brad Peterson
    Lockheed P-3 Orion

    Lockheed P-3 Orion

  • Brad Peterson
    Lockheed P-3 Orion

    Lockheed P-3 Orion

  • Brad Peterson
    Lockheed P-3 Orion

    Lockheed P-3 Orion

  • Brad Peterson
    Lockheed P-3 Orion

    Lockheed P-3 Orion

  • Brad Peterson
    Lockheed P-3 Orion

    Lockheed P-3 Orion

  • Brad Peterson
    Lockheed P-3 Orion

    Lockheed P-3 Orion

  • Brad Peterson
    Lockheed P-3 Orion

    Lockheed P-3 Orion

  • Brad Peterson
    Lockheed P-3 Orion

    Lockheed P-3 Orion

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7459

    BPD_7459

  • Brad Peterson
    Lockheed P-3 Orion

    Lockheed P-3 Orion

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7456

    BPD_7456

  • Brad Peterson
    Lockheed P-3 Orion

    Lockheed P-3 Orion

  • Brad Peterson
    Lockheed P-3 Orion

    Lockheed P-3 Orion

  • Brad Peterson
    Lockheed P-3 Orion

    Lockheed P-3 Orion

  • Brad Peterson
    Lockheed P-3 Orion

    Lockheed P-3 Orion

  • Brad Peterson
    Lockheed P-3 Orion

    Lockheed P-3 Orion

  • Brad Peterson
    L-188 Electra The L-1888 was the first large turboprop airliner built in the US. Unfortunately, after two fatal crashes, orders for the plane stopped. However, modifications to the design have allowed the Electra to continue firefighting even today.

    L-188 Electra
The L-1888 was the first large turboprop airliner built in the US. Unfortunately, after two fatal crashes, orders for the plane stopped. However, modifications to the design ha ...

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7450

    BPD_7450

  • Brad Peterson
    L-188 Electra The L-1888 was the first large turboprop airliner built in the US. Unfortunately, after two fatal crashes, orders for the plane stopped. However, modifications to the design have allowed the Electra to continue firefighting even today.

    L-188 Electra
The L-1888 was the first large turboprop airliner built in the US. Unfortunately, after two fatal crashes, orders for the plane stopped. However, modifications to the design ha ...

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7448

    BPD_7448

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7446

    BPD_7446

  • Brad Peterson
    Lockheed P-3 Orion

    Lockheed P-3 Orion

  • Brad Peterson
    Lockheed P-3 Orion

    Lockheed P-3 Orion

  • Brad Peterson
    Lockheed P-3 Orion

    Lockheed P-3 Orion

  • Brad Peterson
    Lockheed P-3 Orion

    Lockheed P-3 Orion

  • Brad Peterson
    Lockheed P-3 Orion

    Lockheed P-3 Orion

  • Brad Peterson
    Lockheed P-3 Orion

    Lockheed P-3 Orion

  • Brad Peterson
    Lockheed P-3 Orion

    Lockheed P-3 Orion

  • Brad Peterson
    Lockheed P-3 Orion

    Lockheed P-3 Orion

  • Brad Peterson
    B-25 From the Doolittle Raid to water bombing, the B-25 has been in action for over 73 years

    B-25
From the Doolittle Raid to water bombing, the B-25 has been in action for over 73 years

  • Brad Peterson
    Lockheed P-3 Orion

    Lockheed P-3 Orion

  • Brad Peterson
    BAe 146 You may have flown on the BAe 146 when it was used by airlines, but many of them now have been converted for firefighting.

    BAe 146
You may have flown on the BAe 146 when it was used by airlines, but many of them now have been converted for firefighting.

  • Brad Peterson
    DC-10 Here's some heavy metal. The DC-10 can drop 12,000 gallons of water - that's up to 10 times more than most mainstream firefighting aircraft.

    DC-10
Here's some heavy metal. The DC-10 can drop 12,000 gallons of water - that's up to 10 times more than most mainstream firefighting aircraft.

  • Brad Peterson
    Lockheed P-3 Orion

    Lockheed P-3 Orion

  • Brad Peterson
    Lockheed P-3 Orion

    Lockheed P-3 Orion

  • Brad Peterson
    Lockheed P-3 Orion

    Lockheed P-3 Orion

  • Brad Peterson
    B-25 From the Doolittle Raid to water bombing, the B-25 has been in action for over 73 years

    B-25
From the Doolittle Raid to water bombing, the B-25 has been in action for over 73 years

  • Brad Peterson
    Lockheed P-3 Orion

    Lockheed P-3 Orion

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7421

    BPD_7421

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7419

    BPD_7419

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7416

    BPD_7416

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7415

    BPD_7415

  • Brad Peterson
    C-130 The US Forest Service started using C-130s in the 1970s for firefighting. Their fleet was grounded in 2004, but they spent years suppressing fires and containing oil slicks. The National Guard uses them with the Modular Airborne FireFighting System (MAFFS).

    C-130
The US Forest Service started using C-130s in the 1970s for firefighting. Their fleet was grounded in 2004, but they spent years suppressing fires and containing oil slicks. The Nation ...

  • Brad Peterson
    C-130 The US Forest Service started using C-130s in the 1970s for firefighting. Their fleet was grounded in 2004, but they spent years suppressing fires and containing oil slicks. The National Guard uses them with the Modular Airborne FireFighting System (MAFFS).

    C-130
The US Forest Service started using C-130s in the 1970s for firefighting. Their fleet was grounded in 2004, but they spent years suppressing fires and containing oil slicks. The Nation ...

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7408

    BPD_7408

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7406

    BPD_7406

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7403

    BPD_7403

  • Brad Peterson
    Airtankers or water bombers are fixed-wing aircraft fitted with tanks that can be filled on the ground at an air tanker base or, in the case of flying boats and amphibious aircraft, by skimming water from lakes, reservoirs, or large rivers. Various aircraft have been used over the years for firefighting. In 1947, the United States Air Force and United States Forest Service experimented with military aircraft dropping water-filled bombs. The bombs were unsuccessful, and the use of internal water tanks was adopted instead.[7] Though World War II- and Korean War-era bombers were for a long time the mainstay of the aerial firefighting fleet,[8] newer purpose-built tankers have since come online. The smallest are the Single Engine Air Tankers (SEATs). These are agricultural sprayers that generally drop about 800 US gallons (3,000 l) of water or retardant. An example is the Air Tractor AT-802, which can deliver around 800 US gallons (3,000 l) of water or fire retardant solution in each drop. Another is the Soviet Antonov An-2 biplane. Both of these aircraft can be fitted with floats that can scoop water from the surface of a body of water. Similar in configuration to the World War II?era Consolidated PBY Catalina, the Canadair CL-215 and its derivative the CL-415 are designed and built specifically for firefighting. The Croatian Air Force uses six CL-415ss as well as six AT 802s for firefighting purposes. Medium-sized modified aircraft include the Grumman S-2 Tracker (retrofitted with turboprop engines as the S-2T) as used by the California Department of Forestry & Fire Protection, as well as the Conair Firecat version developed and used by Conair Group Inc. of Canada, while the Douglas DC-4, the Douglas DC-7, the Lockheed C-130 Hercules, the Lockheed P-2 Neptune, and the Lockheed P-3 Orion ? and its commercial equivalent, the L-188 Electra ? have been used as air tankers. Conair also converted a number of Convair 580 and Fokker F27 Friendship turboprop airliners to air tankers.[9] The largest aerial firefighter ever used is a Boeing 747 aerial firefighter, known as the Global Supertanker, that can carry 19,600 US gallons (74,200 l) fed by a pressurized drop system. The Supertanker was deployed operationally for the first time in 2009, fighting a fire in Spain.[10] The tanker made its first American operation on August 31, 2009 at the Oak Glen Fire.[11][12] It has since been replaced by a Boeing 747-400.[13] Another wide body jetliner that is currently being used as an air tanker is the modified McDonnell Douglas DC-10 operated by the 10 Tanker Air Carrier company as the DC-10 Air Tanker.[14] It can carry up to 12,000 US gallons (45,400 l) of fire fighting retardant. The Russian Ministry of Emergency Situations operates convertible-to-cargo Ilyushin Il-76 airtankers that have been operating with 11,000-US-gallon (41,600 l) tanking systems, and several Beriev Be-200 jet powered amphibians. The Be-200 can carry a maximum payload of about 12,000 litres (3,200 US gal) of water, making "scoops" in suitable stretches of water in 14 seconds. Bombardier's Dash 8 Q Series aircraft are the basis of new, next-generation air tankers. Cascade Aerospace has converted two pre-owned Q400s to act as part-time water bomber and part-time transport aircraft for France's SÚcuritÚ Civile,[15] while Neptune Aviation is converting a pre-owned Q300 as a prototype to augment its Lockheed P-2 Neptune aircraft. The SÚcuritÚ Civile also operates twelve Canadair CL-415 and nine Conair Turbo Firecat aircraft. Neptune Aviation also currently operates converted British Aerospace 146 jetliners as air tankers.[16] The BAe 146 can carry up to 3,000 gallons of fire fighting retardant. Air Spray USA Ltd. of Chico, California has also converted the BAe 146 jetliner to the role of air tanker.[17] Another modern-era passenger aircraft that has now been converted for aerial firefighting missions in the U.S. is the McDonnell Douglas MD-87 jetliner.[18][19] The MD-87 can carry up to 4,000 gallons of fire fighting retardant.

    Airtankers or water bombers are fixed-wing aircraft fitted with tanks that can be filled on the ground at an air tanker base or, in the case of flying boats and amphibious aircraft, by skimm ...

  • Brad Peterson
    Lockheed P2V

    Lockheed P2V

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7398

    BPD_7398

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7397

    BPD_7397

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7396

    BPD_7396

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7395

    BPD_7395

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7394

    BPD_7394

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7393

    BPD_7393

  • Brad Peterson
    Color marks the area hit by the drop, and the fertilizer encourages regrowth of plants in the burn area. The red stuff is a fire retardant rather than a fire extinguisher, slowing progress to give firefighters time to reach the area. The retardant will stain your house if it lands on it, though it washes off.Aug 30, 2007

    Color marks the area hit by the drop, and the fertilizer encourages regrowth of plants in the burn area. The red stuff is a fire retardant rather than a fire extinguisher, slowing progress t ...

  • Brad Peterson
    Airtankers or water bombers are fixed-wing aircraft fitted with tanks that can be filled on the ground at an air tanker base or, in the case of flying boats and amphibious aircraft, by skimming water from lakes, reservoirs, or large rivers. Various aircraft have been used over the years for firefighting. In 1947, the United States Air Force and United States Forest Service experimented with military aircraft dropping water-filled bombs. The bombs were unsuccessful, and the use of internal water tanks was adopted instead.[7] Though World War II- and Korean War-era bombers were for a long time the mainstay of the aerial firefighting fleet,[8] newer purpose-built tankers have since come online. The smallest are the Single Engine Air Tankers (SEATs). These are agricultural sprayers that generally drop about 800 US gallons (3,000 l) of water or retardant. An example is the Air Tractor AT-802, which can deliver around 800 US gallons (3,000 l) of water or fire retardant solution in each drop. Another is the Soviet Antonov An-2 biplane. Both of these aircraft can be fitted with floats that can scoop water from the surface of a body of water. Similar in configuration to the World War II?era Consolidated PBY Catalina, the Canadair CL-215 and its derivative the CL-415 are designed and built specifically for firefighting. The Croatian Air Force uses six CL-415ss as well as six AT 802s for firefighting purposes. Medium-sized modified aircraft include the Grumman S-2 Tracker (retrofitted with turboprop engines as the S-2T) as used by the California Department of Forestry & Fire Protection, as well as the Conair Firecat version developed and used by Conair Group Inc. of Canada, while the Douglas DC-4, the Douglas DC-7, the Lockheed C-130 Hercules, the Lockheed P-2 Neptune, and the Lockheed P-3 Orion ? and its commercial equivalent, the L-188 Electra ? have been used as air tankers. Conair also converted a number of Convair 580 and Fokker F27 Friendship turboprop airliners to air tankers.[9] The largest aerial firefighter ever used is a Boeing 747 aerial firefighter, known as the Global Supertanker, that can carry 19,600 US gallons (74,200 l) fed by a pressurized drop system. The Supertanker was deployed operationally for the first time in 2009, fighting a fire in Spain.[10] The tanker made its first American operation on August 31, 2009 at the Oak Glen Fire.[11][12] It has since been replaced by a Boeing 747-400.[13] Another wide body jetliner that is currently being used as an air tanker is the modified McDonnell Douglas DC-10 operated by the 10 Tanker Air Carrier company as the DC-10 Air Tanker.[14] It can carry up to 12,000 US gallons (45,400 l) of fire fighting retardant. The Russian Ministry of Emergency Situations operates convertible-to-cargo Ilyushin Il-76 airtankers that have been operating with 11,000-US-gallon (41,600 l) tanking systems, and several Beriev Be-200 jet powered amphibians. The Be-200 can carry a maximum payload of about 12,000 litres (3,200 US gal) of water, making "scoops" in suitable stretches of water in 14 seconds. Bombardier's Dash 8 Q Series aircraft are the basis of new, next-generation air tankers. Cascade Aerospace has converted two pre-owned Q400s to act as part-time water bomber and part-time transport aircraft for France's SÚcuritÚ Civile,[15] while Neptune Aviation is converting a pre-owned Q300 as a prototype to augment its Lockheed P-2 Neptune aircraft. The SÚcuritÚ Civile also operates twelve Canadair CL-415 and nine Conair Turbo Firecat aircraft. Neptune Aviation also currently operates converted British Aerospace 146 jetliners as air tankers.[16] The BAe 146 can carry up to 3,000 gallons of fire fighting retardant. Air Spray USA Ltd. of Chico, California has also converted the BAe 146 jetliner to the role of air tanker.[17] Another modern-era passenger aircraft that has now been converted for aerial firefighting missions in the U.S. is the McDonnell Douglas MD-87 jetliner.[18][19] The MD-87 can carry up to 4,000 gallons of fire fighting retardant.

    Airtankers or water bombers are fixed-wing aircraft fitted with tanks that can be filled on the ground at an air tanker base or, in the case of flying boats and amphibious aircraft, by skimm ...

  • Brad Peterson
    Airtankers or water bombers are fixed-wing aircraft fitted with tanks that can be filled on the ground at an air tanker base or, in the case of flying boats and amphibious aircraft, by skimming water from lakes, reservoirs, or large rivers. Various aircraft have been used over the years for firefighting. In 1947, the United States Air Force and United States Forest Service experimented with military aircraft dropping water-filled bombs. The bombs were unsuccessful, and the use of internal water tanks was adopted instead.[7] Though World War II- and Korean War-era bombers were for a long time the mainstay of the aerial firefighting fleet,[8] newer purpose-built tankers have since come online. The smallest are the Single Engine Air Tankers (SEATs). These are agricultural sprayers that generally drop about 800 US gallons (3,000 l) of water or retardant. An example is the Air Tractor AT-802, which can deliver around 800 US gallons (3,000 l) of water or fire retardant solution in each drop. Another is the Soviet Antonov An-2 biplane. Both of these aircraft can be fitted with floats that can scoop water from the surface of a body of water. Similar in configuration to the World War II?era Consolidated PBY Catalina, the Canadair CL-215 and its derivative the CL-415 are designed and built specifically for firefighting. The Croatian Air Force uses six CL-415ss as well as six AT 802s for firefighting purposes. Medium-sized modified aircraft include the Grumman S-2 Tracker (retrofitted with turboprop engines as the S-2T) as used by the California Department of Forestry & Fire Protection, as well as the Conair Firecat version developed and used by Conair Group Inc. of Canada, while the Douglas DC-4, the Douglas DC-7, the Lockheed C-130 Hercules, the Lockheed P-2 Neptune, and the Lockheed P-3 Orion ? and its commercial equivalent, the L-188 Electra ? have been used as air tankers. Conair also converted a number of Convair 580 and Fokker F27 Friendship turboprop airliners to air tankers.[9] The largest aerial firefighter ever used is a Boeing 747 aerial firefighter, known as the Global Supertanker, that can carry 19,600 US gallons (74,200 l) fed by a pressurized drop system. The Supertanker was deployed operationally for the first time in 2009, fighting a fire in Spain.[10] The tanker made its first American operation on August 31, 2009 at the Oak Glen Fire.[11][12] It has since been replaced by a Boeing 747-400.[13] Another wide body jetliner that is currently being used as an air tanker is the modified McDonnell Douglas DC-10 operated by the 10 Tanker Air Carrier company as the DC-10 Air Tanker.[14] It can carry up to 12,000 US gallons (45,400 l) of fire fighting retardant. The Russian Ministry of Emergency Situations operates convertible-to-cargo Ilyushin Il-76 airtankers that have been operating with 11,000-US-gallon (41,600 l) tanking systems, and several Beriev Be-200 jet powered amphibians. The Be-200 can carry a maximum payload of about 12,000 litres (3,200 US gal) of water, making "scoops" in suitable stretches of water in 14 seconds. Bombardier's Dash 8 Q Series aircraft are the basis of new, next-generation air tankers. Cascade Aerospace has converted two pre-owned Q400s to act as part-time water bomber and part-time transport aircraft for France's SÚcuritÚ Civile,[15] while Neptune Aviation is converting a pre-owned Q300 as a prototype to augment its Lockheed P-2 Neptune aircraft. The SÚcuritÚ Civile also operates twelve Canadair CL-415 and nine Conair Turbo Firecat aircraft. Neptune Aviation also currently operates converted British Aerospace 146 jetliners as air tankers.[16] The BAe 146 can carry up to 3,000 gallons of fire fighting retardant. Air Spray USA Ltd. of Chico, California has also converted the BAe 146 jetliner to the role of air tanker.[17] Another modern-era passenger aircraft that has now been converted for aerial firefighting missions in the U.S. is the McDonnell Douglas MD-87 jetliner.[18][19] The MD-87 can carry up to 4,000 gallons of fire fighting retardant.

    Airtankers or water bombers are fixed-wing aircraft fitted with tanks that can be filled on the ground at an air tanker base or, in the case of flying boats and amphibious aircraft, by skimm ...

  • Brad Peterson
    Airtankers or water bombers are fixed-wing aircraft fitted with tanks that can be filled on the ground at an air tanker base or, in the case of flying boats and amphibious aircraft, by skimming water from lakes, reservoirs, or large rivers. Various aircraft have been used over the years for firefighting. In 1947, the United States Air Force and United States Forest Service experimented with military aircraft dropping water-filled bombs. The bombs were unsuccessful, and the use of internal water tanks was adopted instead.[7] Though World War II- and Korean War-era bombers were for a long time the mainstay of the aerial firefighting fleet,[8] newer purpose-built tankers have since come online. The smallest are the Single Engine Air Tankers (SEATs). These are agricultural sprayers that generally drop about 800 US gallons (3,000 l) of water or retardant. An example is the Air Tractor AT-802, which can deliver around 800 US gallons (3,000 l) of water or fire retardant solution in each drop. Another is the Soviet Antonov An-2 biplane. Both of these aircraft can be fitted with floats that can scoop water from the surface of a body of water. Similar in configuration to the World War II?era Consolidated PBY Catalina, the Canadair CL-215 and its derivative the CL-415 are designed and built specifically for firefighting. The Croatian Air Force uses six CL-415ss as well as six AT 802s for firefighting purposes. Medium-sized modified aircraft include the Grumman S-2 Tracker (retrofitted with turboprop engines as the S-2T) as used by the California Department of Forestry & Fire Protection, as well as the Conair Firecat version developed and used by Conair Group Inc. of Canada, while the Douglas DC-4, the Douglas DC-7, the Lockheed C-130 Hercules, the Lockheed P-2 Neptune, and the Lockheed P-3 Orion ? and its commercial equivalent, the L-188 Electra ? have been used as air tankers. Conair also converted a number of Convair 580 and Fokker F27 Friendship turboprop airliners to air tankers.[9] The largest aerial firefighter ever used is a Boeing 747 aerial firefighter, known as the Global Supertanker, that can carry 19,600 US gallons (74,200 l) fed by a pressurized drop system. The Supertanker was deployed operationally for the first time in 2009, fighting a fire in Spain.[10] The tanker made its first American operation on August 31, 2009 at the Oak Glen Fire.[11][12] It has since been replaced by a Boeing 747-400.[13] Another wide body jetliner that is currently being used as an air tanker is the modified McDonnell Douglas DC-10 operated by the 10 Tanker Air Carrier company as the DC-10 Air Tanker.[14] It can carry up to 12,000 US gallons (45,400 l) of fire fighting retardant. The Russian Ministry of Emergency Situations operates convertible-to-cargo Ilyushin Il-76 airtankers that have been operating with 11,000-US-gallon (41,600 l) tanking systems, and several Beriev Be-200 jet powered amphibians. The Be-200 can carry a maximum payload of about 12,000 litres (3,200 US gal) of water, making "scoops" in suitable stretches of water in 14 seconds. Bombardier's Dash 8 Q Series aircraft are the basis of new, next-generation air tankers. Cascade Aerospace has converted two pre-owned Q400s to act as part-time water bomber and part-time transport aircraft for France's SÚcuritÚ Civile,[15] while Neptune Aviation is converting a pre-owned Q300 as a prototype to augment its Lockheed P-2 Neptune aircraft. The SÚcuritÚ Civile also operates twelve Canadair CL-415 and nine Conair Turbo Firecat aircraft. Neptune Aviation also currently operates converted British Aerospace 146 jetliners as air tankers.[16] The BAe 146 can carry up to 3,000 gallons of fire fighting retardant. Air Spray USA Ltd. of Chico, California has also converted the BAe 146 jetliner to the role of air tanker.[17] Another modern-era passenger aircraft that has now been converted for aerial firefighting missions in the U.S. is the McDonnell Douglas MD-87 jetliner.[18][19] The MD-87 can carry up to 4,000 gallons of fire fighting retardant.

    Airtankers or water bombers are fixed-wing aircraft fitted with tanks that can be filled on the ground at an air tanker base or, in the case of flying boats and amphibious aircraft, by skimm ...

  • Brad Peterson
    Color marks the area hit by the drop, and the fertilizer encourages regrowth of plants in the burn area. The red stuff is a fire retardant rather than a fire extinguisher, slowing progress to give firefighters time to reach the area. The retardant will stain your house if it lands on it, though it washes off.Aug 30, 2007

    Color marks the area hit by the drop, and the fertilizer encourages regrowth of plants in the burn area. The red stuff is a fire retardant rather than a fire extinguisher, slowing progress t ...

  • Brad Peterson
    Airtankers or water bombers are fixed-wing aircraft fitted with tanks that can be filled on the ground at an air tanker base or, in the case of flying boats and amphibious aircraft, by skimming water from lakes, reservoirs, or large rivers. Various aircraft have been used over the years for firefighting. In 1947, the United States Air Force and United States Forest Service experimented with military aircraft dropping water-filled bombs. The bombs were unsuccessful, and the use of internal water tanks was adopted instead.[7] Though World War II- and Korean War-era bombers were for a long time the mainstay of the aerial firefighting fleet,[8] newer purpose-built tankers have since come online. The smallest are the Single Engine Air Tankers (SEATs). These are agricultural sprayers that generally drop about 800 US gallons (3,000 l) of water or retardant. An example is the Air Tractor AT-802, which can deliver around 800 US gallons (3,000 l) of water or fire retardant solution in each drop. Another is the Soviet Antonov An-2 biplane. Both of these aircraft can be fitted with floats that can scoop water from the surface of a body of water. Similar in configuration to the World War II?era Consolidated PBY Catalina, the Canadair CL-215 and its derivative the CL-415 are designed and built specifically for firefighting. The Croatian Air Force uses six CL-415ss as well as six AT 802s for firefighting purposes. Medium-sized modified aircraft include the Grumman S-2 Tracker (retrofitted with turboprop engines as the S-2T) as used by the California Department of Forestry & Fire Protection, as well as the Conair Firecat version developed and used by Conair Group Inc. of Canada, while the Douglas DC-4, the Douglas DC-7, the Lockheed C-130 Hercules, the Lockheed P-2 Neptune, and the Lockheed P-3 Orion ? and its commercial equivalent, the L-188 Electra ? have been used as air tankers. Conair also converted a number of Convair 580 and Fokker F27 Friendship turboprop airliners to air tankers.[9] The largest aerial firefighter ever used is a Boeing 747 aerial firefighter, known as the Global Supertanker, that can carry 19,600 US gallons (74,200 l) fed by a pressurized drop system. The Supertanker was deployed operationally for the first time in 2009, fighting a fire in Spain.[10] The tanker made its first American operation on August 31, 2009 at the Oak Glen Fire.[11][12] It has since been replaced by a Boeing 747-400.[13] Another wide body jetliner that is currently being used as an air tanker is the modified McDonnell Douglas DC-10 operated by the 10 Tanker Air Carrier company as the DC-10 Air Tanker.[14] It can carry up to 12,000 US gallons (45,400 l) of fire fighting retardant. The Russian Ministry of Emergency Situations operates convertible-to-cargo Ilyushin Il-76 airtankers that have been operating with 11,000-US-gallon (41,600 l) tanking systems, and several Beriev Be-200 jet powered amphibians. The Be-200 can carry a maximum payload of about 12,000 litres (3,200 US gal) of water, making "scoops" in suitable stretches of water in 14 seconds. Bombardier's Dash 8 Q Series aircraft are the basis of new, next-generation air tankers. Cascade Aerospace has converted two pre-owned Q400s to act as part-time water bomber and part-time transport aircraft for France's SÚcuritÚ Civile,[15] while Neptune Aviation is converting a pre-owned Q300 as a prototype to augment its Lockheed P-2 Neptune aircraft. The SÚcuritÚ Civile also operates twelve Canadair CL-415 and nine Conair Turbo Firecat aircraft. Neptune Aviation also currently operates converted British Aerospace 146 jetliners as air tankers.[16] The BAe 146 can carry up to 3,000 gallons of fire fighting retardant. Air Spray USA Ltd. of Chico, California has also converted the BAe 146 jetliner to the role of air tanker.[17] Another modern-era passenger aircraft that has now been converted for aerial firefighting missions in the U.S. is the McDonnell Douglas MD-87 jetliner.[18][19] The MD-87 can carry up to 4,000 gallons of fire fighting retardant.

    Airtankers or water bombers are fixed-wing aircraft fitted with tanks that can be filled on the ground at an air tanker base or, in the case of flying boats and amphibious aircraft, by skimm ...

  • Brad Peterson
    Airtankers or water bombers are fixed-wing aircraft fitted with tanks that can be filled on the ground at an air tanker base or, in the case of flying boats and amphibious aircraft, by skimming water from lakes, reservoirs, or large rivers. Various aircraft have been used over the years for firefighting. In 1947, the United States Air Force and United States Forest Service experimented with military aircraft dropping water-filled bombs. The bombs were unsuccessful, and the use of internal water tanks was adopted instead.[7] Though World War II- and Korean War-era bombers were for a long time the mainstay of the aerial firefighting fleet,[8] newer purpose-built tankers have since come online. The smallest are the Single Engine Air Tankers (SEATs). These are agricultural sprayers that generally drop about 800 US gallons (3,000 l) of water or retardant. An example is the Air Tractor AT-802, which can deliver around 800 US gallons (3,000 l) of water or fire retardant solution in each drop. Another is the Soviet Antonov An-2 biplane. Both of these aircraft can be fitted with floats that can scoop water from the surface of a body of water. Similar in configuration to the World War II?era Consolidated PBY Catalina, the Canadair CL-215 and its derivative the CL-415 are designed and built specifically for firefighting. The Croatian Air Force uses six CL-415ss as well as six AT 802s for firefighting purposes. Medium-sized modified aircraft include the Grumman S-2 Tracker (retrofitted with turboprop engines as the S-2T) as used by the California Department of Forestry & Fire Protection, as well as the Conair Firecat version developed and used by Conair Group Inc. of Canada, while the Douglas DC-4, the Douglas DC-7, the Lockheed C-130 Hercules, the Lockheed P-2 Neptune, and the Lockheed P-3 Orion ? and its commercial equivalent, the L-188 Electra ? have been used as air tankers. Conair also converted a number of Convair 580 and Fokker F27 Friendship turboprop airliners to air tankers.[9] The largest aerial firefighter ever used is a Boeing 747 aerial firefighter, known as the Global Supertanker, that can carry 19,600 US gallons (74,200 l) fed by a pressurized drop system. The Supertanker was deployed operationally for the first time in 2009, fighting a fire in Spain.[10] The tanker made its first American operation on August 31, 2009 at the Oak Glen Fire.[11][12] It has since been replaced by a Boeing 747-400.[13] Another wide body jetliner that is currently being used as an air tanker is the modified McDonnell Douglas DC-10 operated by the 10 Tanker Air Carrier company as the DC-10 Air Tanker.[14] It can carry up to 12,000 US gallons (45,400 l) of fire fighting retardant. The Russian Ministry of Emergency Situations operates convertible-to-cargo Ilyushin Il-76 airtankers that have been operating with 11,000-US-gallon (41,600 l) tanking systems, and several Beriev Be-200 jet powered amphibians. The Be-200 can carry a maximum payload of about 12,000 litres (3,200 US gal) of water, making "scoops" in suitable stretches of water in 14 seconds. Bombardier's Dash 8 Q Series aircraft are the basis of new, next-generation air tankers. Cascade Aerospace has converted two pre-owned Q400s to act as part-time water bomber and part-time transport aircraft for France's SÚcuritÚ Civile,[15] while Neptune Aviation is converting a pre-owned Q300 as a prototype to augment its Lockheed P-2 Neptune aircraft. The SÚcuritÚ Civile also operates twelve Canadair CL-415 and nine Conair Turbo Firecat aircraft. Neptune Aviation also currently operates converted British Aerospace 146 jetliners as air tankers.[16] The BAe 146 can carry up to 3,000 gallons of fire fighting retardant. Air Spray USA Ltd. of Chico, California has also converted the BAe 146 jetliner to the role of air tanker.[17] Another modern-era passenger aircraft that has now been converted for aerial firefighting missions in the U.S. is the McDonnell Douglas MD-87 jetliner.[18][19] The MD-87 can carry up to 4,000 gallons of fire fighting retardant.

    Airtankers or water bombers are fixed-wing aircraft fitted with tanks that can be filled on the ground at an air tanker base or, in the case of flying boats and amphibious aircraft, by skimm ...

  • Brad Peterson
    Airtankers or water bombers are fixed-wing aircraft fitted with tanks that can be filled on the ground at an air tanker base or, in the case of flying boats and amphibious aircraft, by skimming water from lakes, reservoirs, or large rivers. Various aircraft have been used over the years for firefighting. In 1947, the United States Air Force and United States Forest Service experimented with military aircraft dropping water-filled bombs. The bombs were unsuccessful, and the use of internal water tanks was adopted instead.[7] Though World War II- and Korean War-era bombers were for a long time the mainstay of the aerial firefighting fleet,[8] newer purpose-built tankers have since come online. The smallest are the Single Engine Air Tankers (SEATs). These are agricultural sprayers that generally drop about 800 US gallons (3,000 l) of water or retardant. An example is the Air Tractor AT-802, which can deliver around 800 US gallons (3,000 l) of water or fire retardant solution in each drop. Another is the Soviet Antonov An-2 biplane. Both of these aircraft can be fitted with floats that can scoop water from the surface of a body of water. Similar in configuration to the World War II?era Consolidated PBY Catalina, the Canadair CL-215 and its derivative the CL-415 are designed and built specifically for firefighting. The Croatian Air Force uses six CL-415ss as well as six AT 802s for firefighting purposes. Medium-sized modified aircraft include the Grumman S-2 Tracker (retrofitted with turboprop engines as the S-2T) as used by the California Department of Forestry & Fire Protection, as well as the Conair Firecat version developed and used by Conair Group Inc. of Canada, while the Douglas DC-4, the Douglas DC-7, the Lockheed C-130 Hercules, the Lockheed P-2 Neptune, and the Lockheed P-3 Orion ? and its commercial equivalent, the L-188 Electra ? have been used as air tankers. Conair also converted a number of Convair 580 and Fokker F27 Friendship turboprop airliners to air tankers.[9] The largest aerial firefighter ever used is a Boeing 747 aerial firefighter, known as the Global Supertanker, that can carry 19,600 US gallons (74,200 l) fed by a pressurized drop system. The Supertanker was deployed operationally for the first time in 2009, fighting a fire in Spain.[10] The tanker made its first American operation on August 31, 2009 at the Oak Glen Fire.[11][12] It has since been replaced by a Boeing 747-400.[13] Another wide body jetliner that is currently being used as an air tanker is the modified McDonnell Douglas DC-10 operated by the 10 Tanker Air Carrier company as the DC-10 Air Tanker.[14] It can carry up to 12,000 US gallons (45,400 l) of fire fighting retardant. The Russian Ministry of Emergency Situations operates convertible-to-cargo Ilyushin Il-76 airtankers that have been operating with 11,000-US-gallon (41,600 l) tanking systems, and several Beriev Be-200 jet powered amphibians. The Be-200 can carry a maximum payload of about 12,000 litres (3,200 US gal) of water, making "scoops" in suitable stretches of water in 14 seconds. Bombardier's Dash 8 Q Series aircraft are the basis of new, next-generation air tankers. Cascade Aerospace has converted two pre-owned Q400s to act as part-time water bomber and part-time transport aircraft for France's SÚcuritÚ Civile,[15] while Neptune Aviation is converting a pre-owned Q300 as a prototype to augment its Lockheed P-2 Neptune aircraft. The SÚcuritÚ Civile also operates twelve Canadair CL-415 and nine Conair Turbo Firecat aircraft. Neptune Aviation also currently operates converted British Aerospace 146 jetliners as air tankers.[16] The BAe 146 can carry up to 3,000 gallons of fire fighting retardant. Air Spray USA Ltd. of Chico, California has also converted the BAe 146 jetliner to the role of air tanker.[17] Another modern-era passenger aircraft that has now been converted for aerial firefighting missions in the U.S. is the McDonnell Douglas MD-87 jetliner.[18][19] The MD-87 can carry up to 4,000 gallons of fire fighting retardant.

    Airtankers or water bombers are fixed-wing aircraft fitted with tanks that can be filled on the ground at an air tanker base or, in the case of flying boats and amphibious aircraft, by skimm ...

  • Brad Peterson
    Color marks the area hit by the drop, and the fertilizer encourages regrowth of plants in the burn area. The red stuff is a fire retardant rather than a fire extinguisher, slowing progress to give firefighters time to reach the area. The retardant will stain your house if it lands on it, though it washes off.Aug 30, 2007

    Color marks the area hit by the drop, and the fertilizer encourages regrowth of plants in the burn area. The red stuff is a fire retardant rather than a fire extinguisher, slowing progress t ...

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7383

    BPD_7383

  • Brad Peterson
    Lockheed P2V

    Lockheed P2V

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7381

    BPD_7381

  • Brad Peterson
    Lockheed P2V

    Lockheed P2V

  • Brad Peterson
    My home

    My home

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7360

    BPD_7360

  • Brad Peterson
    BPD_7563

    BPD_7563

  • Brad Peterson
    The material is called Foscheck.It is primarily made up of 85% water, 10%fertilizer (ammonia phosphate and sulfate ions), and 5% minor ingredients(iron oxide for color, clay or bentonite).

    The material is called Foscheck.It is primarily made up of 85% water, 10%fertilizer (ammonia phosphate and sulfate ions), and 5% minor ingredients(iron oxide for color, clay or bentonite).

  • Brad Peterson
    The material is called Foscheck.It is primarily made up of 85% water, 10%fertilizer (ammonia phosphate and sulfate ions), and 5% minor ingredients(iron oxide for color, clay or bentonite).

    The material is called Foscheck.It is primarily made up of 85% water, 10%fertilizer (ammonia phosphate and sulfate ions), and 5% minor ingredients(iron oxide for color, clay or bentonite).

  • Brad Peterson
    The material is called Foscheck.It is primarily made up of 85% water, 10%fertilizer (ammonia phosphate and sulfate ions), and 5% minor ingredients(iron oxide for color, clay or bentonite).

    The material is called Foscheck.It is primarily made up of 85% water, 10%fertilizer (ammonia phosphate and sulfate ions), and 5% minor ingredients(iron oxide for color, clay or bentonite).

  • Keith Levit
    Close-up of incense sticks burning at temple, Krong Siem Reap, Siem Reap, Cambodia

    Close-up of incense sticks burning at temple, Krong Siem Reap, Siem Reap, Cambodia

  • Keith Levit
    Wood burning stove in traditional kitchen, Chiang Rai, Thailand

    Wood burning stove in traditional kitchen, Chiang Rai, Thailand

  • Patty Waymire
    The Fire Dance

    The Fire Dance

  • D'Arcy Evans
    Boss Hogg - Kenworth W900

    Boss Hogg - Kenworth W900

  • Bill Coe (billcoephotos)

    Bill Coe (billcoephotos)'s photo

  • Gary Burke
    Best Burger Ever!

    Best Burger Ever!

  • LIHotShots

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